Child Protection

Monday 1 October 2018

From Street to Orchestra

Razia is 13 years old, and a student in grade six at Afghanistan National Institute of Music (ANIM) where she also studies music.

Wednesday 8 November 2017

Press Release

For immediate release

Save the Children calls for end to corporal punishment in Afghanistan after death of a high school student

November 6, Kabul – Save the Children is urging the Afghan government to properly enforce its corporal punishment ban following reports that a high school student died after facing violence at school. The reported incident took place in the northern Afghan province of Balk.

Tuesday 25 July 2017

Girl's Victim of Traditions

Mahjera, now 17 years old was forced to enter into early marriage three years ago. As a result, she had to drop out of school. She comes from a poor and traditional family. She is living in a very remote area of Kabul with her husband and in laws. Prior to her marriage, Mahjera was at 8th grade and earned the highest scores in her class and was very ambitious.
She was dreaming and planning to become a doctor so she can contribute nancially to her family and help other women who do not have access to the health facilities in their community. She experienced and saw for herself the challenges met by her mother and other women of not having a female doctor in her village. Her dream was cut short when at the middle of her class and education she was forced to drop out of school.
She married a man 10 years older than her. Her husband is a shopkeeper and the bread winner of the whole family. She had
- MAJERAH

hectic days and suffered a lot throughout these years. Her in-laws treat her like a slave and continue to disrespect her because she has not been able to have a child. She is living in a small house with a huge number of family members. She is doing all the house work herself. Her mother in law has always been harsh to her for not being able to have a child and she is very concerned about this. She has visited many doctors trying to get pregnant. She has also been told by her husband that if she is unable to have a baby in the next couple of months, he will remarry.
She has been hit by her husband several times and she does not have access to her basic rights like many other women in Afghanistan.
Girls are highly vulnerable here in Afghanistan.They are constantly mistreated by their families from the very young stages of their lives.They are always told not to challenge and raise questions and to not raise their voice in order to maintain a good reputation and image for the family.
“I never asked my parents to buy me dresses or take me to the park.All I wanted was to study and to become a doctor one day.”
“I was happy when I was able to continue my education. I worked really hard to get good grades. To become a doctor one needs to study hard and have high grades.When my father decided to marry me off, I was heartbroken. Nobody asked or cared. All my dreams were shattered forever. I feel I am not alive anymore. One can’t live without hopes and dreams.”

Wednesday 6 May 2015

Saving Children's Life in Emergencies

Obaid is in 2nd grade at school. He has a family of ten people. He lives with his mother and father and five sisters. He has two brothers as well. They are both married and live apart from them. He is the only wage-earner in his family.

Every day from 8:00 to 12:00 PM he collects cans and then sells them. This is the only source of income for their family. His father is 65-years-old and can’t work anymore.

He dreams to become a doctor so that he can serve the people living in the tents and also all people around the world.

“Now I am in 2nd grade, and I try to go to school. I like school so much though I am working during the day, but I try my best to review my lessons at night, and my father encourages me to study.

During the night when I write my homework, I put the handy light which Save the Children gave us in my mouth and I write. My father does not let me to sleep until I finish my homework, and I love that my father encourages me.

Some days ago the school officials told me that I should come to school with uniform, but when I told my father, he said he can’t buy uniform because he does not have money and can’t afford it.

Each morning until 12:00 PM, I collect cans, and so my clothes get dirty, and when I go to school the other students tell me how dirty my clothes are, and then I become sad. I bring water for my family from other houses.

I dream to become a doctor so that I can serve these people under tents and also all people of the world.”